The Perth Mint

Discussion in 'General Precious Metals Discussion' started by Golden ChipMunk, Oct 26, 2015.

  1. Golden ChipMunk

    Golden ChipMunk Well-Known Member

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    History The Perth Mint
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    Source:The Perth Mint Sketch of The Perth Mint




    The Perth Mint opened in 1899 in response to the discovery of rich gold deposits in Coolgardie and Kalgoorlie. It was Australia's third branch of Britain's Royal Mint - the others being the Sydney Mint and the Melbourne Mint (both closed).


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    The Perth Mint under construction circa 1897


    Diggers, who flocked to the then colony of Western Australia in huge numbers from other parts of Australia and from around the world, deposited their raw gold at The Perth Mint where it was refined and minted into gold coins.

    Gold refining continually took place at the Mint's original Hay Street premises until April 1990, when the operation was moved to a modern facility near Perth Airport. Between 1899 and 1931, The Perth Mint struck more than 106 million gold sovereigns and nearly 735,000 half-sovereigns for use as currency in Australia and throughout the British Empire.
    1899 Perth Mint gold sovereign

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    The visionary leader Sir John Forrest, the first Premier of Western Australia, is regarded as the founding father of The Perth Mint. 'Big John' foresaw the importance of gold in the development of Western Australia's economy, and successfully lobbied the British Government to establish a branch of the Royal Mint in Perth.

    Sir John Forrest

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    Forrest laid the foundation stone of The Perth Mint in 1896. Designed by George Temple Poole, the Mint is one of Perth most impressive colonial-era buildings. In recognition of the quality of the architect's work, The Perth Mint has the highest classification from the National Trust and was one of the first buildings entered on the State's heritage register.

    The Mint stopped making gold sovereigns when Britain abandoned the gold standard in 1931. Nevertheless, the refinery remained busy as staff turned their skills to making fine gold bullion bars. But it was not long before the Mint was involved again in the production of coins.

    Fine gold bullion bars
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    In 1940, with Australia on a war footing, an urgent telegram arrived from the Commonwealth Treasury in Canberra: "Heavy demand for Australian coin and Melbourne Mint working full capacity. Could you undertake minting copper coin?"

    Hundreds of millions of Australian pennies and half pennies were produced by The Perth Mint between 1940 and 1964. The Mint also fulfilled an order for 1.3 million shillings in 1946. Its considerable output was boosted further when Australia introduced decimal currency in 1966. It had produced a staggering 829 million 2 cent coins and 26 million 1 cent coins by 1973.

    The "purest of all gold"

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    Meanwhile, The Perth Mint achieved "arguably the purest of all gold" in 1957. Refinery Officer Leo Hickey and Senior Craftsman Alexander Osborne produced a proof 'plate' of almost six nines - 999.999 parts of gold per thousand - as measured by the Worshipful Company of Goldsmiths in London. The Royal Mint was so impressed that it ordered some of the gold as the benchmark for its own standards.

    The Perth Mint remained under Britain's jurisdiction until 1 July 1970, when ownership transferred to the State Government of Western Australia. The change came at a fortuitous time, preceding by a few years the beginning of a new gold boom. With the price of gold rising dramatically, The Perth Mint became the focus of renewed interest and opportunity.

    The Mint's new direction was formalised in 1987 with the creation of Gold Corporation by a State Act of Parliament. Under a unique agreement with the Commonwealth of Australia's Department of the Treasury, the Mint's new operator was empowered to mint and market gold, silver and platinum Australian legal tender coinage to investors and collectors worldwide.


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    Prime Minister Bob Hawke launches the Australian Nugget in 1987


    At a glittering ceremony in Sydney on 23 April 1987, Prime Minister Bob Hawke helped launch the Mint's new Australian Nugget Gold Coin Series. The first day's trading yielded sales of 155,000 ounces of gold worth $103 million, well above the sales target of 130,000 ounces to the end of June.

    Today, The Perth Mint is a member of an elite group of world mints whose pure gold, silver and platinum legal tender coins are trusted without question. Like the Australian Nugget, its Australian Kookaburra Silver Coin Series, Australian Koala Silver Coin Series, Australian Platypus Platinum Coin Series, and Australian Lunar Gold and Silver Coin Series are extensively sought after by bullion investors worldwide.

    The Mint also issues 'proof' quality collector coins featuring iconic Australian designs, and commemoratives celebrating major international and Australian anniversaries. The stunning quality of these coins reflect the importance of the Mint's traditional skills, and through the use of modern treatments such as colour and gilding, they demonstrate the Mint's canny ability to set new market trends.

    Modern production facilities at The Perth Mint

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    In 2003, The Perth Mint officially opened an 8,400 square metre state-of-the-art manufacturing facility next door to its original limestone building. Dominating the Mint's heritage precinct, these two important buildings are powerful symbols of more than 100 years of minting excellence in Western Australia.

    http://www.perthmint.com.au/visit_the_mint_the_perth_mint_history.aspx
     
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  2. Golden ChipMunk

    Golden ChipMunk Well-Known Member

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    The Swan known as Rampant Swan ~ ( commonly known as Swan Facing Left )


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  3. SilverDJ

    SilverDJ Well-Known Member

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    WTF!
    Makes the BTTF Hoverboard sellout look like a joke.
     
  4. Golden ChipMunk

    Golden ChipMunk Well-Known Member

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    What sort of contribution is this?

    :rolleyes:
    Why quote me? And jump in the wrong thread

    Does this look like BTTF thread????

    REPORTED

    Start yours on thread, and Sh!t on yours but not on my thread.

    Completely out of topic
     
  5. Golden ChipMunk

    Golden ChipMunk Well-Known Member

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    Perth Mint Proof Coins 19551963


    Read all about , where this ....
    Link click to read further
    Numismatics Journal

    Page 1


    Page 34



    Page 38
     
  6. silversearcher

    silversearcher Active Member Silver Stacker

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    Hey Chipmunk can you get a photo of the new facility that makes the new 2015 9999 Kangaroo ? The dimensions would have to be quite substantial. Just the section alone for the extrusion press and the roller bench would need at least 25 -30 meters of space. And all the other equipment like the planchet press and sorting area must make it a massive facility. When you mentioned that you saw pallets 2015 Kangaroos outside the roller doors, you'd think the Perth Mint would beef up security with millions of dollars of bullion sitting out in the open. Members are busting to see what the new facility looks like. Google earth really doesn't cut the mustard. Can't wait to see these snaps on this great post of yours.

    Cheers......
     
  7. bron suchecki

    bron suchecki Active Member Silver Stacker

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    Next you'll be claiming the building is empty and just a front/diversion to hide the fact that RCM mints all our coins. What was that Simpsons episode where Homer tells Bart - can win an argument with a conspiracist, don't try.
     
  8. Golden ChipMunk

    Golden ChipMunk Well-Known Member

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    Hello,
    No bash up in my Thread. - Take it somewhere!!!!!

    This is for References, Education purposes.

    One more like this I will Report.

    No Negative words here. Start your own.
     
  9. GRETZKY427

    GRETZKY427 Active Member Silver Stacker

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  10. Golden ChipMunk

    Golden ChipMunk Well-Known Member

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    It is a medallion so no year on it. This one were the first issued.
    They were produced between 1984-1986, where G W Williams was Perth Mint Director in that period.
    There are a few types - first issued, the 100th Anniversary Coloured.
    I believed there are also Bronze earliest version. Yet to be seen with KGV on the othe side.
    I may have them.
     
  11. Golden ChipMunk

    Golden ChipMunk Well-Known Member

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    The Western Australian Centenary 1929 medals

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    Source: Perth Mint

    Lady McMillan strikes the first Centenary of Western Australia medal. -
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    The Western Australian Centenary 1929 medals were struck at the Perth Branch of the Royal Mint, from 1 inch (38mm) dies produced in England, and from designs also created in England. The obverse side of the medal showing the crowned bust of the then reigning monarch, King George V., was designed by Sir Bertram Mackennal, an Australian artist resident in England. Western Australians were familiar with Sir Bertram's work because he had also been responsible creating the Lord Forrest statue sited at King's Park, Perth. Mackennal's initials B.M. appear to the right of centre at the base of the King's bust. The legend, GEORGIVS V REX ET IND IMP, is quite an unusual choice, and was only used for a very brief time on Canadian coins back in 1911. The reverse design, by English heraldic artist George Kruger Gray, is that of an energetic and vigorous Black Swan, the bird emblem of Western Australia. This design was selected because it was thought to portray the spirit and character of the State at the time. The design was progressive in appearance, a bold choice with support from Mint officials both here and in London, but it was not without its critics. Three other reverse designs had also been presented for appraisal, which included another by Kruger Gray, and two by Hugh Paget showing a traditional treatment of a graceful swan on tranquil water. All four of the reverse designs included the State's motto "Cygnis Insignis" (renowned for its Swans), and the words "Centenary of Western Australia 1929". Kruger Gray also designed the crest and coat-of-arms for the University of Western Australia. Kruger Gray's initials K.G. can be seen to the left of the Swan's front foot below the fold in the ribbon. The first medal was struck in an official ceremony on 15th March, 1929, by Lady McMillan, the wife of the Lieutenant-Governor. Lady McMillan strikes the first Centenary of Western Australia medal. The next two medals struck were made of silver and were presented to Lady McMillan and Mrs. Ellen Collier, the wife of Premier. It is reported that the press then began to make bronze medals at a steady rate of 40 per minute. The first medal struck, and two others described as bronze coloured, were then mounted in a piece of polished jarrah by Mint staff, and presented to the Museum of Western Australia. The first medal struck had a surface analysis performed on it by staff of the University of Melbourne in 2013, and interestingly it was found to contain about 79% copper, 16% zinc and 0.6% nickel. Melbourne Museum has a Western Australia Centenary medal in its collection which it identifies as being made of tombac, and an analysis of its makeup produced similar results to that of the first medal. Tombac, or "Dutch Gold", is a Copper/Zinc alloy with a higher level of Zinc, which was suited for use in medals because of its faux-gold appearance.


    Example of a medal struck in tombac
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    Most of the common bronze medals sampled have a copper content of around 90%, with zinc around 5-7% and only a trace of nickel. The medals have a diameter 38mm, and have a thickness of 3.5mm. The weight of the medals vary, but typically the tombac medals weigh around 30 grams; the bronze medals, 32 grams; the silver medals 39 grams; and the gold medals 62 grams. - See more at: http://blog.perthmint.com.au/2014/10/13/western-australian-centenary-1929-medal
     
  12. Belvedere

    Belvedere Active Member Silver Stacker

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    I am usually very critical of posts that really annoy me. Chips post really annoys me (grammar) but to his credit I think he is really trying to post something worthwhile on this site. I think everyone (including and especially me) needs to read and listen when someone makes a post with heart. Leon1998 take note.

    Thanks Chip.
     
  13. SilverDJ

    SilverDJ Well-Known Member

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    Wow, chill out a little.
    Sorry I "quoted" you when in fact I was quoting the article you posted.
    I was just amazed at the first day trading of those Nugget gold coins, and thought to compare it with a recent timely single day sellout in the Hoverboards we were all talking about.
    So I was actually on-topic in talking about my amazement in the article you posted. Perhaps it could have spurred some discussion? because, you know, $103M in a day in sales is kinda freaking amazing?
    But instead I get reported for a comparison to a recent event? :rolleyes:
     
  14. Golden ChipMunk

    Golden ChipMunk Well-Known Member

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    This Thread is a mini version of The Perth Mint Archives

    I am building for References & Educational purposes.

    So I suggest, Any Irrelevant contexts or Posts, not associates, Refrain from Posting.

    This may takes times to build. ;)
     
  15. SilverDJ

    SilverDJ Well-Known Member

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    Would help if you said this up front.
    This is the "General Precious Metals Discussion" section after all.
     
  16. Golden ChipMunk

    Golden ChipMunk Well-Known Member

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    What happened to all the medals produced in celebration of Western Australia's Centenary in 1929?

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    What happened to all the medals produced in celebration of Western Australia's Centenary in 1929? Glenn Burghall's research reveals that they were presented to a broad range of people from ordinary school children right up to the reigning monarch! - See more at: http://blog.perthmint.com.au/2014/1...enary-1929-medal-part-2/#sthash.fdpftfwe.dpuf






    An example of the Centenary medal struck in silver
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    Source: Perth Mint




    Approximately 85,000 medals were struck at the Perth Branch of the Royal Mint to commemorate the Western Australian Centenary in 1929, and about 85% of these were distributed to the school-aged children of the State. Bronze medals celebrating the Centenary of Western Australia were presented to more than 70,000 school children in 1929. Friday 13th September, 1929 was earmarked as the day for local communities to celebrate "Children's Day", and with speeches and performances in the morning, followed by sporting carnivals in the afternoon, the format for the day was pretty consistent throughout Western Australia. In one of the exceptions though, the older students from the hills town of Jarrahdale were able to visit The Perth Mint on that day to see how the medals, that they had received the night before, were made. The State Government provided one shilling for each child on the school roll to help feed and entertain them. Local community groups raised additional funds to make the day a very exciting and memorable day of celebration for the children which would last long in the participants' minds. It was a day to acknowledge the contributions from those people that had built their communities, to reinforce the need for hard work and self-improvement, and to instil a positive outlook for the future prospects of the children, and their State. When addressing 800 or so children at Busselton, William Mann, M.L.C., said that they should treasure and care for their Centenary medals, and although those present would not see the next centenary, those medals that have been handed down for posterity would have their true value realised. Each child was presented with a bronze medal in small buff coloured envelope made for the purpose. This envelope was different to envelopes used for the medals that were sold, and on this type of envelope the price of a bronze medal is given as one shilling. Local Roads Boards were able to provide bronze medals to children, too young for school, at the subsidised price of threepence. About 9,000 bronze medals were sold, either by the Mint, or with the assistance from the Banks, through their extensive state-wide branch network. For a period, The Perth Mint, at the request of the Government, suspended sales of the bronze medals so as not to devalue their appeal to the children. It was expected that they would not receive their medals until later in the year. A special type of bronze medal was struck for the oldest residents in the State, and a local daily newspaper published details of those recipients on a regular basis. Another 94 of the special bronze medals in cases were awarded to winners at the Royal Agricultural Society's Centenary Show. Just less than 900 silver medals were struck, but only a number around 660 were ever issued. Almost as many were presented as gifts to significant organisations and people outside of Western Australia as were sold within. The cost of each silver medal was seven shillings and sixpence. An example of the Centenary medal struck in silver. Three gold medals were struck and the whereabouts of two of these medals is known. One gold medal was commissioned by Perth City Council and sent to Perth, Scotland. Another gold medal, struck very late in the Centenary year, for the W.A. Historical Society, was sent to the man depicted on the obverse side of the medal King George V. About the author: Glenn Burghall has an interest in Western Australian history and actively seeks out stories about the events and personalities from the State's Centenary year, 1929. Glenn is using current technology and tools to give a modern treatment to items of interest from that significant time in Western Australia's development. Glenn has assisted the Perth City Council with research into, and presentation of, a Centenary display at Council House, Perth. - See more at: http://blog.perthmint.com.au/2014/1...enary-1929-medal-part-2/#sthash.fdpftfwe.dpuf
     
  17. Golden ChipMunk

    Golden ChipMunk Well-Known Member

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  18. silversearcher

    silversearcher Active Member Silver Stacker

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    Hi Chipmunk, Thanks for this post. Your clearly a man quite passionate about the Perth Mint and it's history. And living in Perth makes it more special to you. And I also like the way you get on board and get people involved in SS meetings in Perth. I found some of information very interesting and informative in this post. I'm a fan of the earlier material Perth Mint produced. Some of their modern stuff I find cheesy, and to be honest I'm not a big fan of some of their designs in recent years. Anyway that a matter of taste, and of course people can spend their money on anything they desire. Putting aside my previous question, which was legitimate but will get no where like sawing sawdust, and I wish to ask a more historical question.

    I while ago post by Ronnie666 asked a question about a specific medallion made between 1984 -1990 from memory. I believe there were 3 coins made in the series in this era on behalf of, or for The Numismatic Society. I have one of these medallions under lock and key elsewhere. From memory it had " Numismatic Society " written on it. Could you make a post on all 3 medallions with their history and mintages and time of issue. I could get hold of a photo of the mine later on ( if needed ). I think having the history of all 3 medallions correlated in one post would be great. And with your knowledge, I think this would make a interesting post.....Thanks

    Cheers.
     
  19. Golden ChipMunk

    Golden ChipMunk Well-Known Member

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    Please refer to the link

    Help-on-these-2-perth-mint-medallions
     
  20. Golden ChipMunk

    Golden ChipMunk Well-Known Member

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