Sovereign Collections

Discussion in 'Gold Coins' started by projack, Jul 23, 2021.

  1. projack

    projack Well-Known Member Silver Stacker

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    Since it is nearly impossible to collect entire series of these wonderful coins, here are a few suggested types of collections each with its own challenges and rewards.
    Queen Elizabeth Type Set
    One of each type produced.
    Affordable to most budgets over a few years and quite enjoyable.
    1957 Sovereign 1957 has finer milling than later issues
    1958-1968 The First portrait is available at around bullion for BU examples.
    1985-1997 Proof only and rather difficult to obtain.
    1989 1989 issue is quite popular comes up fairly regularly
    1999 Large head obverse and 3 different reverses, deceptively simple, St George shown here.
    2002 Shield Reverse
    2005 Stylized St George Reverse
    ........................
    King George V Mints Set
    One of each mint produced.
    George V ruled at height of the Royal Mints reach and is the only monarch whose portrait appears on sovereigns from all 7 branches.
    Suits most budgets, starting from bullion up to AUD$500,000 each
    Sydney Mint Most expensive and cheapest of the set,
    Melbourne Mint Well struck most dates, relatively common.
    London Mint 1913 most common, 1917 rarest.
    Ottawa Mint 1917 seen most often, not easy in higher grades
    Pretoria Mint 1927, 1928 very common in higher grade, 1923 and 1924 nearly impossible.
    Perth Mint Usual weak strike most years, Choice Uncs for every budget.
    Bombay Mint 1918 only, top examples not easy.

    Queen Victoria Type Set
    One of each type produced.
    Affordable to most budgets over a few years and quite enjoyable.
    Those with a substantial budget could attempt this in proofs only, the Young portrait ones are very rare.
    Young Head St George Reverse Produced from 1871 in Sydney and London, Melbourne started in 1872, purists may wish to note that there is 3 or so slightly different versions of this portrait.
    Young Head Shield Reverse Produced in London from 1838, with branch mints commencing in 1871 & 1872 purists may wish to note that there is 5 or so slightly different versions of this portrait.
    Jubilee Head Produced in 3 mints 1887 to 1893, Michael Marsh notes 2 types of this obverse.
    Veiled Head Produced in 4 mints from 1893 to 1901. Perth commenced in 1899.

    Monarch Type Set
    One of each monarch type produced.
    Bit of a challenge this one in strictly Uncirculated condition or an interesting and, somewhat good value method to gather the proofs from this series.
    George III 1818 rarest of all sovereigns, other dates obtainable in Unc with patience.
    George IV, Laureate Head. Not easy to find in better grades.
    George IV, Bare Head. Proof depicted here, only found slightly more than earlier portrait.
    William IV Not often found in collectable grades.
    Queen Victoria, Young Head, St George. A well struck high grade version is truly a thing of beauty to behold.
    Queen Victoria, Young Head, Shield. Shield design is quite hard wearing, still retains good eye appeal at lower grades but Unc minimum to buy.
    Queen Victoria, Jubilee Head. Proof depicted here, Choice Uncs are achievable.
    Queen Victoria, Veiled Head. Proof depicted here, Choice Uncs are achievable.
    Edward VII Matte Proof depicted here, Choice Uncs are difficult to find.
    George V, Large Head. 1920 Sydney is the rarest of this series to 1911 Sydney in Choice available. A coin for every budget. London Proof Depicted Here
    George V, Small Head. A low point in sovereign history, general standard is not high, Unc versions can be quite disappointing.
    George VI 1937 Proofs only, plain edged, often "edge bruised".
    Queen Elizabeth II Proofs near impossible, Gem UNC's for around bullion.
    Queen Elizabeth II, Decimal. Proofs around bullion, good value to gather.
    Queen Elizabeth II, 3rd Portrait. Deceptively difficult to obtain.
    Queen Elizabeth II, 500th Anniversary. Single Year Issue in 1989, rather attractive design available in Proof only.
    Queen Elizabeth II, Old Head Proofs and bullion issues still affordable.

    Australian Sovereigns were minted in Sydney from 1855 to 1926, Melbourne from 1872 to 1931 and Perth from 1899 to 1931. Therefore, from 1872 it is possible to have exactly the same type and dated Australian Sovereign struck at both the Sydney and Melbourne mints and 1899 at the Perth Mint. This, however, was not the same case every year, Sovereigns could be produced at one mint, two mints or all three mints and when enough coins were thought to be in circulation no sovereigns were produced at all. A complete Collection of Australian Gold Sovereigns encompasses all those produced between 1855 and 1931 at they Sydney, Melbourne and Perth Mints some 190 pieces in total.
    The first Australian Sovereigns feature our own unique Australian design and are known as the famous and Rare "Sydney Mint" type sovereigns struck from 1855 to 1870. From 1871 to 1931 when production ceased, Imperial sovereigns were produced in Australia distinguishable only by a (S) Sydney, (M) Melbourne or (P) Perth Mint marks stamped onto each coin.
    Australian Sovereigns may be collected by Date, Type, Mint or a combination of these. Take the Queen Victoria Veiled Head Series (1893-1901), it contains a total of 21 coins - 9 struck in Sydney, 9 in Melbourne and 3 in Perth. If you decide to collect this series the aim is to piece together one example of each of the 21 different dated and Minted Veiled Head Type Sovereigns ever struck. In most series there are certain key dates which will cost you considerably more than the others but these make very good Investments and are worth saving up for. In the Veiled Head series

    The simple fact is that unlike the modern mass produced issues released from the Government Mints in Canberra and Perth today, the Sovereigns are no longer produced and in fact as time goes by there are less and less remaining in existence. With more and more interested Collectors and Investors in the market and less coins it makes good sense to start putting some away now as a nest egg for your Retirement or to pass onto your children
     
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  2. GF

    GF Well-Known Member Silver Stacker

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    That is awesome....thankyou
     
  3. hardyakkagold

    hardyakkagold Well-Known Member Silver Stacker

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    Lots of good detailed information there @projack, unfortunately being able to purchase Unc QEII sovereigns for around bullion value is no longer the case.

    I have been trying to put together a collection of the 1958-68 issues recently without too much success as I always get overbid at auctions.

    In BU condition they are going for around 20% - 30% over bullion value, bit less if they have some wear and blemishes.

    Come to think of it, the last time I managed to purchase sovereigns for around bullion value in any condition was last year, things have tightened up considerably since then despite the lower gold prices.
     
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  4. JulieW

    JulieW Well-Known Member Silver Stacker

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    Excellent resource thanks Projack.
     
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  5. DavidW

    DavidW Member

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    Great summary Projack
     
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  6. bubblebobble2

    bubblebobble2 Well-Known Member Silver Stacker

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    didn’t we hv this on auction last week?
     
  7. projack

    projack Well-Known Member Silver Stacker

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    I also try to collect the 1957-68 issues (60 and 61 were not made). What I miss are 57, 62, 63 and 68. However, I have a lot of unc.. 66 and 67, and some plus 58s that I can swap with if anyone has any of my missing ones.
     
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  8. projack

    projack Well-Known Member Silver Stacker

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    More info

    1892 Sydney Relatively common in high grade, part of Swiss hoard, well struck year, ChUnc minimum
    1893 Melbourne The Jubilee Head version of this is quite scarce in higher grade, date to watch
    1899 Perth Mostly poorly struck issue, been informed MS-64 is possible
    1899 Sydney Relatively common in higher grade, large hoard in Swiss Banks released late 90's to about 2003, Choice Unc minimum to buy. Some evidence suggests that there are still rolls available today.
    1902 Matte Proof Nearly all have some kind of wipe mark, anecdotal evidence of Mint workers wiping coins. Impaired and damaged proofs common, Coins pickled after strike.
    1908 Perth Seems to be only Perth date to be available in ChUnc for Edward VII, considered well struck for a Perth issue.
    1916 London All of this issue exported to the USA and melted into ingots, rare
    1917 London All of this issue exported to the USA and melted into ingots, extremely rare.
    1926 Sydney All of this issue exported to the UK and melted into ingots, rare.
    1929/30/31 George V St George is different, much weedier, detail in obverse is not as strong as "large head", hair appears quite flat
    1957-1968 Most went to Syria, Lebanon, Egypt and Israel to attempt to blunt demand for counterfeits being produced in that region, most of remaining orders came from Australia and Canada.
    1968 Most went to Greece, according to 1971 ACR article, the Military Junta put a stop to further orders for gold.
    Perth Mint Most issues poorly struck, some years better than others.
    Grade before Rarity. Demand drops very sharply for grades lower than Unc, grade is priority when deciding on which examples to purchase.
    2007 St George Reverse. Royal Mint Re-Engraved St George Reverse From Original Model of Pistricci's, many changes to design, but Mint says much closer to original work.
     
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  9. JulieW

    JulieW Well-Known Member Silver Stacker

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    Indeed true. It was mine.

    There was a case to hold on to it, since I've only ever seen one for sale and that's the one I just sold.

    Still, collector coins are for collectors, and I'm into quantity now, not quality, so it was for the auction block.
     
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  10. SlyGuy

    SlyGuy Active Member

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    Mark me down for the "whatever they send me in 'Random Year Sovereign' mailings of sales at bullion shops" collection?
     
  11. hardyakkagold

    hardyakkagold Well-Known Member Silver Stacker

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    The sovereigns seem to be selling well at the present time, a dealer I trade with recently had a stack of worn bullion grade sovereigns for sale
    at about $100 over spot price,( I thought he was dreaming) now he is all sold out.

    It wasn't that many years ago that you could actually buy uncirculated sovereigns at auction for about spot prices, now you are lucky to find
    a bent, holed, or buggered one for that price.
     
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  12. JulieW

    JulieW Well-Known Member Silver Stacker

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    What's a price range currently for sovs?
     
  13. SlyGuy

    SlyGuy Active Member

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    Spot +7% to 15% or more premium right now in most places.
    In a regular market, half that premium range, or even less, is norm for sovereigns.

    It is sellers market for anything PM... was a major seller market a year ago, but still clearly a sellers market.
    I don't think I've paid over 5% premium on any, and I have hundreds and have been buying for years. I can only remember a few brief periods where they were like this.
     
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  14. Shlomo Goldberg

    Shlomo Goldberg Well-Known Member Silver Stacker

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    Thanks for the time, effort & interest to put this work together for our community.
    From memory, my first trade here was a silver to sovereigns trade.
     
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  15. jultorsk

    jultorsk Well-Known Member Silver Stacker

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    This is a very popular set to collect, 10 coins required for the complete "Gillick" heads BU dates.
    I've bought all mine from auctions, part of the fun is in the chase I suppose. Still missing '59 and '64.

    Nice thread, thank you @projack.
     
  16. jultorsk

    jultorsk Well-Known Member Silver Stacker

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    Maybe worth adding that the Royal Mint has a habit of producing a "special reverse" sovereign along with QEII jubilees - 2002, 2012 and there will be one for next year as well.
    These special editions are generally collectible, but I also anticipate a huge mintage for next year due to the significant, historical milestone (Platinum Jubilee, 70 years on the throne).
    New sovs are typically released around November, the design has not been revealed yet.

    Most-Collectible-Sovereigns-Blog-Image-All-5-Large.png
     
  17. hardyakkagold

    hardyakkagold Well-Known Member Silver Stacker

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    I am also after a 1964 Sovereign preferably in BU grade if anyone has one that they might be willing to part with please PM me, willing to offer well above spot
    price for one in top condition.

    There is a 1964 one coming up for sale soon, but it was part of the L.J.Sherwin Collection so I expect it to sell for $700 with the buyer's premium if not more.

    Why does modern coinage need pedigrees anyway?

    I can understand a 1930 penny or a Holey Dollar being sold with ownership pedigrees, but these days it is getting absurd with a set of 6 $200 Pride of Australia
    attracting bids of nearly $5,500 already in the same sale, just because they are ex David Ross Collection.
     
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