HEADS UP! Australia Post enforce bullion/coins are prohibited rule on my domestic shipment

Discussion in 'Silver' started by tongkat, Jul 9, 2020.

  1. Investing for kids

    Investing for kids Well-Known Member

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    The how come its ok when my Bullion Store sends me it?
     
  2. SilverDJ

    SilverDJ Well-Known Member

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    Because many people think that Australia Post should have no say in what you send (as long as it's not dangerous/illegal), so everyone just ignores the rule. Or they simply don't know.
    Anyone with half a clue marks metal as "machined parts" or similar, if a description is required. No description requirement for pre-paid satchels.
     
  3. Krakked789

    Krakked789 Well-Known Member

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    I've been thinking of ordering several 1 oz kookaburra sinkers... :D
     
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  4. Krakked789

    Krakked789 Well-Known Member

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    I wouldn't be surprised to see this become a more frequent occurrence in the current climate.
     
  5. Bigfella

    Bigfella Well-Known Member Silver Stacker

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    I had sent hundreds of international express with full description and last year i had one sent back for the same reason.
    Now I write "Collectable silver ingots" and the numb nuts don't know the difference between bullion and an ingot. Collectable seams to help also.
    Just my 2 cents.
     
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  6. Stoic Phoenix

    Stoic Phoenix Well-Known Member Silver Stacker

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    ^ same, anything going overseas marked as "collectable or commemorative"
     
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  7. SULLA

    SULLA Member Silver Stacker

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  8. Silverling

    Silverling Well-Known Member Silver Stacker

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    That maybe true but I can tell you this for a fact. They sent my last order via StarTrack Airlock. Startrack is owned by Australia Post. When my delivery came it was the local Australia Post (same guy that delivers my wine) contractor that came. Startrack Airlock means you must show show your identity to the delivery person and verify your name and address. I had my license in my hand and he didn't look nor ask for it and I didn't even have to sign for it. So yeah, they used Australia Post services to transport my bullion.
     
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  9. Golden ChipMunk

    Golden ChipMunk Well-Known Member

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  10. hardyakkagold

    hardyakkagold Well-Known Member

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    Yes dangerous to the powers that be, as bullion represent real money for us peasants, that the bankers can't inflate out of existence over time
    leaving us with nothing to show for our hard work over a lifetime.

    Expect this type of harassment to increase substantially in the future as the metals hot up and the economy cools down.

    They are going to use whatever means are at their disposal to discourage and limit how, where, and when we can purchase precious metals.
     
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  11. alor

    alor Well-Known Member Silver Stacker

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    they will ban .999 being in the post too
    by
    'Disturbing': Trump USPS head announces major changes,
     
  12. Ipv6Ready

    Ipv6Ready Well-Known Member Silver Stacker

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    So in a nutshell...

    Legal Tender precious metal coins and Banknotes
    • Can be posted by Parcel post with SOD domestically
    • Can be posted by Express post with SOD domestically
    • Can be posted by Registered post with SOD domestically
    • All can be insured via Auspost to $200 max of face value ie 200 x $1 for 1 oz silver Kangaroo
    • Basically if package is lost tough luck
    Bullion is not accepted by Auspost for postage by any method
    • Presumably if one does not declare as per normal it is pot luck ie one in few million parcels get returned
    • If package is lost, tough luck
     
  13. JohnnyBravo300

    JohnnyBravo300 Well-Known Member

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    Why do they care if bullion is mailed? I don't understand why they focus on it or try to dissuade people?
    How is it different than any other package?
     
  14. Ipv6Ready

    Ipv6Ready Well-Known Member Silver Stacker

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    Id presume it's due to business insurance and fraud
     
  15. JohnnyBravo300

    JohnnyBravo300 Well-Known Member

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    Is there an unusual amount of postal fraud and theft there?
     
  16. Ipv6Ready

    Ipv6Ready Well-Known Member Silver Stacker

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    Postal fraud hmmm likely about the same as US or any other developed countries.

    Likely something happened in past and it was set in stone, or since auspost insures almost every letter or parcel up to $100 for free, it was a condition their insurance provider insisted on.
     
  17. PhilDePunter

    PhilDePunter New Member

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    I'm inclined to go with "soldering filler material" to cover for silver bullion? It can certainly be used for that purpose.

    Edit: Yep, good enough for me, plenty of mentions of silver on Wiki for such purpose.....

    Soldering filler materials are available in many different alloys for differing applications. In electronics assembly, the eutectic alloy with 63% tin and 37% lead (or 60/40, which is almost identical in melting point) has been the alloy of choice. Other alloys are used for plumbing, mechanical assembly, and other applications. Some examples of soft-solder are tin-lead for general purposes, tin-zinc for joining aluminium, lead-silver for strength at higher than room temperature, cadmium-silver for strength at high temperatures, zinc-aluminium for aluminium and corrosion resistance, and tin-silver and tin-bismuth for electronics.

    A eutectic formulation has advantages when applied to soldering: the liquidus and solidus temperatures are the same, so there is no plastic phase, and it has the lowest possible melting point. Having the lowest possible melting point minimizes heat stress on electronic components during soldering. And, having no plastic phase allows for quicker wetting as the solder heats up, and quicker setup as the solder cools. A non-eutectic formulation must remain still as the temperature drops through the liquidus and solidus temperatures. Any movement during the plastic phase may result in cracks, resulting in an unreliable joint.

    Common solder formulations based on tin and lead are listed below. The fraction represent percentage of tin first, then lead, totaling 100%:

    63/37: melts at 183 °C (361 °F) (eutectic: the only mixture that melts at a point, instead of over a range)
    60/40: melts between 183–190 °C (361–374 °F)
    50/50: melts between 183–215 °C (361–419 °F)
    For environmental reasons (and the introduction of regulations such as the European RoHS (Restriction of Hazardous Substances Directive), lead-free solders are becoming more widely used. They are also suggested anywhere young children may come into contact with (since young children are likely to place things into their mouths), or for outdoor use where rain and other precipitation may wash the lead into the groundwater. Unfortunately, most lead-free solders are not eutectic formulations, melting at around 250 °C (482 °F), making it more difficult to create reliable joints with them.

    Other common solders include low-temperature formulations (often containing bismuth), which are often used to join previously-soldered assemblies without unsoldering earlier connections, and high-temperature formulations (usually containing silver) which are used for high-temperature operation or for first assembly of items which must not become unsoldered during subsequent operations. Alloying silver with other metals changes the melting point, adhesion and wetting characteristics, and tensile strength. Of all the brazing alloys, silver solders have the greatest strength and the broadest applications.[3] Specialty alloys are available with properties such as higher strength, the ability to solder aluminum, better electrical conductivity, and higher corrosion resistance.[4]
     
    Last edited: Aug 20, 2020
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