For sale - a unique piece of Australian history

Discussion in 'Australia & New Zealand (Public)' started by serial, Jan 25, 2020.

  1. serial

    serial Well-Known Member Silver Stacker

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2012
    Messages:
    5,249
    Likes Received:
    1,600
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    wa
    So this will obviously be going on ebay but hey, I thought I would offer it here 1st.
    I have 2 items that I feel should be kept together due to their historical link and both items can be yours for only $4,000 posted

    To begin with I have a type one Victoria Volunteer Long & Efficient Service Medal which by itself is rare with normal examples having changed hands at auction houses for upwards of $2k but this particular medal is unique, not only because it is one of a handful that were issued before official royal sanction was received in 1881 but because of who it was issued to. The Gentlemen who it was issued to is one of the founding members of Australia, a man who emigrated to Australia in 1820 and would become a highly respected member of parliament helping to establish many of the laws that helped to shape Australia with the pinnacle of his political career being reached when he served as the premier of nsw a number of times. Items like these appear on the open market very rarely with many held by strong hands or museums.

    1 - Victoria Volunteer Long & Efficient Service Medal (VVLESM).

    (Issued 1881-1901)

    "Victoria was the only Colony and State in Australia to provide a Long Service Medal of "strictly local content". All other states had medals mostly identical to the British issue, but with State names on the reverse. These medals were stuck by the Royal Mint in London. In fact NSW did not issue long service medals to its naval forces until 191215. The Victorian medal, with its other differences, was struck in Melbourne by Thomas Stokes.

    In 1871 the issue of a Long Service Medal was considered for ten years* effective service, but it was not until 1875 that design and die costs of £150 were presented from England. This price being considered outrageous, samples of the then issued British Long Service Medals were presented to Messrs Stokes and Martin of Melbourne in 1880, who proceded with the design and and die work at a cost of only £25, a considerable difference from the London quotation."1

    As royal sanction had not been obtained in time for the presenting of the first batch of medals in 1881, the Govenor relactantly declined to present the medals. To quote David Matthews8 "the first recipients were wearing the medal before Queen Victoria had given her approval for its award, an unusual and daring act in those days." Perhaps this was an indication of the young colony's growing self confidence.

    * The original intention of awarding the medal for ten years service changed as, when introduced, the medal was awarded for 15 years of service.

    http://adb.anu.edu.au/biography/robertson-sir-john-4490

    Sir John Robertson

    Sir John Robertson, KCMG (15 October 1816 – 8 May 1891) was an Australian politician and Premier of New South Wales on five occasions. Robertson is best remembered for land reform and in particular the Robertson Land Acts of 1861, which sought to open up the selection of Crown land and break the monopoly of the squatters.

    Robertson was elected to Parliament in 1856 supporting manhood suffrage, secret ballot, electorates based on equal populations, abolition of state aid to religion, government non-denominational schools, free trade, and land reform. He saw free selection of crown land before survey as the key to social reform with poor settlers being able to occupy agricultural and pastoral land, even that occupied by lease-holding squatters. This insight enabled him to dominate the politics of 1856–61.

    Australia - 1880 Melbourne International Exhibition Prize Medal..Silver, 51mm

    Issued during the 1880 Melbourne International Exhibition this silver medal was awarded to participants who won their area, people who were recognized for their contribution and service to the exhibition and officials at the exhibition. It is not uncommon to obtain one issued to a worker or prize winner but to obtain one like this that was issued to a high ranking official, in this case a chairmen of a jury, is incredibly rare. In addition this particular medal was awarded to the former premier of NSW Sir John Robertson. A piece of pre federation Australian history this item would be a great addition to the collection of any Australian historian.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Robertson_(premier)
    http://adb.anu.edu.au/biography/robertson-sir-john-4490
    http://www.cerberus.com.au/medals.html
    http://www.numismatics.org.au/pdfjournal/Vol16/Vol 16 Article 2.pdf
     
  2. serial

    serial Well-Known Member Silver Stacker

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2012
    Messages:
    5,249
    Likes Received:
    1,600
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    wa
  3. maverick

    maverick Active Member Silver Stacker

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2018
    Messages:
    329
    Likes Received:
    195
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Location:
    Sydney
    wow!
     
    serial likes this.
  4. madaw1

    madaw1 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2011
    Messages:
    1,622
    Likes Received:
    1,375
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Great Western Country
    What a piece of history !!-I only wish,I could buy these...
     
  5. JulieW

    JulieW Well-Known Member Silver Stacker

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2010
    Messages:
    13,583
    Likes Received:
    3,034
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Australia
    What is the policy of the War Museum? Does the AWM have a budget to allow for purchases of items like this, so that they don't leave Australia?

    I've read occasional news snippets about items being purchased. Perhaps drop them an email and ask if they'd be interested in purchasing them.
     
    66rounds likes this.
  6. serial

    serial Well-Known Member Silver Stacker

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2012
    Messages:
    5,249
    Likes Received:
    1,600
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    wa
    I did consider that Julie, what concerns me is that they can turn around and say that it is an item of national importance and demand I hand it over at a price decided by them.
    I would have not problem dealing with them but they have tools that would make any negotiation inequitable and I would rather get a fair market value for my property
     
    pi and madaw1 like this.
  7. madaw1

    madaw1 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2011
    Messages:
    1,622
    Likes Received:
    1,375
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Great Western Country
    Could they force you to sell them on the price they wanted??!:confused:
     
  8. serial

    serial Well-Known Member Silver Stacker

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2012
    Messages:
    5,249
    Likes Received:
    1,600
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    wa
    yes they can
    Protection of Movable Cultural Heritage Act 1986
    https://www.legislation.gov.au/Details/C2016C01056

    "
    7 Movable cultural heritage of Australia

    (1) A reference in section 8 to the movable cultural heritage of Australia is a reference to objects that are of importance to Australia, or to a particular part of Australia, for ethnological, archaeological, historical, literary, artistic, scientific or technological reasons, being objects falling within one or more of the following categories:
    ...
    (d) military objects;
    ...

    Part III—Administration



    15 National Cultural Heritage Committee

    There shall be a committee, to be known as the National Cultural Heritage Committee.

    16 Functions of Committee

    The functions of the Committee are:

    (a) to furnish advice to the Minister, either of its own motion or on request made to it by the Minister:

    (i) in relation to the operation of this Act;

    (ii) in relation to objects that should be included in, or removed from, the Control List;

    (iii) in relation to the classification and re‑classification of objects so included; and

    (iv) in relation to the operation of the National Cultural Heritage Account;

    (b) to furnish advice to the Minister pursuant to subsections 10(4) and 10A(5);

    (c) to establish and maintain the register referred to in section 22; and

    (d) to consult and co‑operate with appropriate authorities of the Commonwealth, of the States and of the Territories, and with other organisations, associations and persons, on matters related to its functions.
     
    STKR and madaw1 like this.
  9. serial

    serial Well-Known Member Silver Stacker

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2012
    Messages:
    5,249
    Likes Received:
    1,600
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    wa
    Basically, they get wind of the item, the committee declare it a class a or b item, they claim that I intend to sell it overseas, they seize the item, fine me and then keep the item.
    im not saying that they will, but the fact they can give them an unfair advantage in any discussion relating to its fair market value
     
    pi and madaw1 like this.
  10. JulieW

    JulieW Well-Known Member Silver Stacker

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2010
    Messages:
    13,583
    Likes Received:
    3,034
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Australia
    Fair enough. I forgot, momentarily, that one shouldn't dangle anything of value near a government bureaucracy as it is almost guaranteed that they will steal it and demand you say thank you for the privilege.
     
    STKR and ozcopper like this.
  11. serial

    serial Well-Known Member Silver Stacker

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2012
    Messages:
    5,249
    Likes Received:
    1,600
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    wa
    Julie, your 100% right
    The legislation actually states that you pay the governments costs in taking and transporting your stuff, its mad
     
    STKR likes this.

Share This Page