Cognac Quartz. A nice stone to cut.

Discussion in 'Jewellery & Gems' started by silversearcher, Dec 21, 2017.

  1. silversearcher

    silversearcher Active Member Silver Stacker

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2012
    Messages:
    832
    Likes Received:
    146
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Location:
    Australia
    I'm still enjoying the entire process of cutting gems. The polishing of large facets is getting easier, but there is no doubt that the larger the facet the more difficult the polishing is. Tiny 1-3 carat stones are by far less complex than a large stone.


    STONE.JPG
     
  2. BenKenobi

    BenKenobi Active Member

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2016
    Messages:
    336
    Likes Received:
    184
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Location:
    Perth
    Nice effort, out of interest what polish lap are you using on Quartz, I have been using BATT with diamond #100,000. I have found the polish to be sufficient with this combo but that being said it still does not polish like the harder gems, I don't think I will set up for Quartz specific polish. Looking good anyway.
     
  3. silversearcher

    silversearcher Active Member Silver Stacker

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2012
    Messages:
    832
    Likes Received:
    146
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Location:
    Australia
    I'm using a lucite lap (old school). But using a higher grade cerium oxide than most (gold grade). Seems to polish better than the standard cerium that the gem clubs use. I have a tin lap but haven't used that yet. Would like to polish topaz or garnets on that. I believe garnet polishes well with high grade Aluminium oxide on lucite also. I believe that quartz is the more difficult material to polish. As the facets get bigger the more difficult the process gets.
     
  4. BenKenobi

    BenKenobi Active Member

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2016
    Messages:
    336
    Likes Received:
    184
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Location:
    Perth
    Yep lucite very old school, used to have, got it with my first machine in the bundle of gear I had with it, most of which I threw out for various reasons, i did try cerium and found it too slow for me on the hard stuff and had to be super careful with it heating and melting my shellac dop goo. I can say that tin laps polish vey well, I have a pure tin as well as the BATT, the rest are copper. From memory the only lap I still have from the original purchase of my first machine is a #240 sintered, looks like it will last my lifetime. I have also found with purchasing loose diamond grit that some are far better than others, I bought mine in 10ct lots back in the 90s and are still using the same stuff, I have cut hundreds of gems on it and still going, if you are interested, buy some new baby syringes from the chemist, some Lucerin, mix a carat of diamond or 2 on a clean spoon with some Lucerin and pack the syringe, use extreme care as the diamond will go everywhere, mix with a matchstick, tot thick etc, you might only fill the syringe halfway but it will last for years, if you use it correctly that is. From memory I first purchased mine from Shel lap supplies, I doubt very much if the same supplier is used now, the #100,000 was very dark like a dark slate grey in colour. Great to see you doing well
     
    Last edited: Jan 1, 2018
  5. silversearcher

    silversearcher Active Member Silver Stacker

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2012
    Messages:
    832
    Likes Received:
    146
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Location:
    Australia
    Yeah, l'm told lucite is slower with cerium. I think most use cerium on quartz not tin and diamond. Some use cerium ultra laps, but they wear out quick and to get a high polish you still have to add more of the cerium mix, you may as well use a lucite lap and save the money. The thing is with the cerium when mixed with water it sinks to the bottom and while dabbing it on the lucite it will really start to thin out and the polishing gets slower as you go along. So you need to keep a good eye on the cerium water ratio.
     

Share This Page