The Inflation Thread

Discussion in 'Markets & Economies' started by ozcopper, Apr 1, 2013.

  1. Clawhammer

    Clawhammer Well-Known Member Silver Stacker

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    ^^^
    Your P.O. Box must be enormous by now :p
     
  2. ozcopper

    ozcopper Well-Known Member Silver Stacker

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  3. The Crow

    The Crow Member Silver Stacker

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    Just came across this: my two cents worth :)
    This is a great example of the not-free-market. If the AIDS-HIV were the ones responsible for paying for the treatment (yes, I know that wouldn't be fair or whatever) but if they were, they wouldn't be able to pay, the market would be shown not to be able to sustain the price and the price would fall. I do realise this would mean that only the wealthy would be able to afford health care. What this is an example of is how these powerful organisations hold governments to ransom. The government is "forced" to pay on behalf of individuals, they can't afford not to, and the big pharma companies know this. There are other scams that cost the taxpayer huge sums, indirectly, such as the cholesterol medication scam and the blood pressure myth .......
    Pharma gets paid to do trials, that "surprise, surprise" justifies medication, and the government has to fork out through PBS. I'm not saying that PBS isn't necessary, but heck, we need far better administration of it!
     
  4. Jislizard

    Jislizard Well-Known Member Silver Stacker

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    I read the article and apart from the writer saying "Planned obsolescence is a myth, pure and simple." there is nothing in the article to back this statement up.

    Instead he talks about obsolescence, which most people accept as being perfectly normal. Computers get better each year, faster, more memory etc. and while you can still use old computers, they become less useful as their technology ages, that is normal obsolescence, not 'planned obsolescence'. Computer manufacturers don't need to plan their obsolescence, they don't need to have parts designed to wear out and need replacing, it is the technology that needs replacing every couple of years and most people are happy to be able to make use of the new features.

    The documentary "The Lightbulb Conspiracy" came out in 2010, a year after that article was written but there are plenty of good reviews of the film http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1825163/reviews?ref_=ttexrv_sa_3 which do a better job of critically analysing the concept of Planned Obsolescence, several point out the flaws in the documentary.

    We bought a $100 Breville kettle in 2005 and it is still going strong, the $14 Crazy Clark's kettles my in-laws buy need replacing every couple of years.
     
  5. Jislizard

    Jislizard Well-Known Member Silver Stacker

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    I also blame medical insurance companies for this. If people couldn't afford to have operations or buy expensive pharmaceuticals then the doctors wouldn't just retrain to become taxi drivers. They would try to find the price point at which their services would become affordable.

    Governments and insurance companies basically skew the picture by enabling people who can't afford the service to get the service by taking money from everyone else. And doctors and pharma companies don't care where the money comes from as long as they get it and the government and the insurance companies don't mind the cost because they aren't paying it themselves. The public don't mind paying the government and insurance companies because they can get very expensive treatments for a fraction of the cost.

    Everyone gets a bargain apparently!
     
  6. The Crow

    The Crow Member Silver Stacker

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    With the computer industry, the "planned" obsolescence factor comes with the software. Yes, the hardware will outlast the software and the unit becomes redundant/obsolete as it can no longer be used on networks, with new peripherals, etc. Is this planned? I would say a very definite, yes. All of the uses I have ever had for a computer can in reality be achieved with software of 10 years ago. The software gets re-engineered constantly so that all of the "butterflies" can chase fresh flowers, new i-phones, etc. I would still use menu-driven software if it were available as a modern computer running on that kind of DOS would be AMAZING. But people love new, love whizzbang, etc, etc. And the IT industry love making money - so a perfect match. It's people like me who look to functionality not features, that get left behind and have to keep forking out for stuff I don't want - hence the whinging, and realising, about planned obsolescence.

    As for the comment in these quotes about the fashion industry: I call bullshit! But in a friendly manner :) The fashion industry is pure churning, pure planned obsolescence. There is NOOOOOOOOOOOOO money in fashion not changing. The fashion industry is the magazines, the TV shows, the constant bombardment of everyone to keep up with fashion. The money in the fashion industry is absolutely based on planned obsolescence, the constant turnover of new concepts.

    Is this bad??? That's the real question. It generates a lot of waste. It seriously annoys people like me, with a stack of redundant gear that still works perfectly well. It generates employment, keeps economies running by secondary economic activity.

    My parents bought a fridge in the late 1950s - I had to leave it behind when I moved interstate in 2000. It was still running fine. Issues around obsolescence for older people will always be viewed in the context of earlier days when technology was not changing so rapidly.
     
  7. ozcopper

    ozcopper Well-Known Member Silver Stacker

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    So true, I notice my daughters old XP laptop now wont run the newest version of itunes which means she can't use it now to sync to her iphone. I mostly use linux but have a 2006 imac 20", It still runs everything that I want but won't run later than OS 10.7 which is fine by me as the newer versions are bloated with crap. I loaded windows 7 on it just so my daughter could sync her iphone. I could have run a newer version of itunes natively on my mac, but newer versions are bloated and I don't like the design after version 10 so that's what I use for my music. I know why I like linux, its free, no bloat or spyware, it runs well on old or new computers, it isn't a resource hog, it's only downside is its learning curve is a bit much for many users.
     
  8. Clawhammer

    Clawhammer Well-Known Member Silver Stacker

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    1947 Atlanta Housewife displays a weeks groceries for a family of four, bought for $12.50
    [​IMG]
     
  9. ozcopper

    ozcopper Well-Known Member Silver Stacker

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    No wonder she looks so skinny ;)
     
  10. Tacrezod

    Tacrezod Member

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    What's she going to do with 2lb of salt?
     
  11. Clawhammer

    Clawhammer Well-Known Member Silver Stacker

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    Arhhh back in those days doctors recommended 4kgs salt, margarine, salt & 3 dozen eggs every week. And 2 sticks of celery with your evening martini or bloody mary :p
     
  12. metalzzz

    metalzzz Well-Known Member

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    She slowly kills them with 3 pounds of sugar each week and the salt is to preserve them before burial.
    Look at her smile, she's up to something really slimey
     
  13. metalzzz

    metalzzz Well-Known Member

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    Pretty much all the items you'd find deep in the back of my pantry on a clean out
     
  14. Pirocco

    Pirocco Well-Known Member

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    A while ago I bought a raincoat from a confection chain. It was okay (enough) the first weeks.
    Then, wet spots here and there. It had an inner kinda rubber sheet, and that had some holes alike moths in clothes.
    Couple months later it became too much to continue using the raincoat.
    By that time, that entire sheet was torn to shreds. It was just impossible that it all was due to wear.
    Before throwing it away, I took a part of that sheet, and just laid it outside.
    Well, it ROT.
    It turned out that it was made of some "biodegradable" material, with some eco-doctrine talk around it.
    Last week I came across a pair of rubber boots in a heavily State-sponsored (work for the less capable etc) secondhand shop.
    My size, they looked brandnew, only 4 euro. No doubt I was gonna buy those. Until I read the label. With the word "biodegradable" in it, and some eco mark.
    Its just ridiculous.
    One may wonder why. I did so. And there is an explanation.
    Imagine a world, where lifecycles of products is short enough to make buying/storing them for later useless.
    What is the meaning of this? Well, it effectively makes hoarding and speculation impossible. Total dependence on supply line of the day, controlled by State.

    And while I'm writing this, I remember another recent, and maybe similar case.
    I saw somewhere bags with universal plastic wall plugs for sale. As far as I know, those plugs get sold in plastic containers, cases, boxes, whatever. Some people empty these in toolboxes, shelves etc. But these particular plugs were sold in vacuum bags, with a blue print on them: "Do not open before use".
    No medical stuff or so, but wall plugs. What can explain that lol?
    Did they use a kinda plastic that somehow detoriates in contact with air? If that is the case, then if you use them to mount something on the wall, they get exposed anyway, and usually for a long time. And if that plastic "rots" / whatever away, what happens then to what you mounted? The story of gravity?
    Or does any1 know another explanation for that vacuum sealing?
     

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