RBA orders new Aust bank notes designs

Discussion in 'Banknotes' started by mmm....shiney!, Sep 27, 2012.

  1. Big A.D.

    Big A.D. Well-Known Member Silver Stacker

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    All our notes have different lengths (7mm between denominations) and a lot of equipment relies on a combination of length sensors and optical sensors that check specifically for problems with the notes' transparent windows. The windows are one of the hardest things for forgers to get right and light diffusion checks are a very easy way of weeding out fakes.

    There is new technology out there that does an optical scan check but our notes are so hard to forge that those functions are mostly used for fitness checks to cull worn notes. They're designed with an international market in mind so they're calibrated by just running a heap of legit notes through the machine and allowing it to "learn" the correct features and dimensions from what it sees. If you're in Oz, you'd program the $20s denomination by running Australian $20s through the machine, but if you're in New Zealand you'd run New Zealand $20s through it instead. Manufacturers have to design their equipment to be flexible otherwise they can't compete effectively so there aren't many "Australia Only" note acceptors out there.

    A lot of machines out there (like ATMs) are "dumb" and simply spit out X number of items from Y canister because they assume that the human who maintains them knows what is meant to be dispensed (that's why you occasionally hear stories of ATMs that give out $200 when the user requested $80 - some idiot put the $50s in the $20s canister).

    There will obviously be a fair amount of checking involved and some equipment will need to be recalibrated but it won't be a major issue.
     
  2. willrocks

    willrocks Well-Known Member Silver Stacker

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    Details aside, there's still a cost that will get passed back to every Australian. I'm just wondering what is the net gain from the changeover? Do they hope to reduce counterfeiting? If so by how much?
     
  3. Goldmember

    Goldmember Member

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    Im wondering if theyll put nanotechnology into PMs...lol...then again maybe i shouldnt laugh :eek:
     
  4. willrocks

    willrocks Well-Known Member Silver Stacker

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    Cost of a hammer, priceless. For everything else, microwave for 5 seconds on high.
     
  5. fishball

    fishball New Member Silver Stacker

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  6. hiho

    hiho Active Member Silver Stacker

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    that would make them more collectible :p
     
  7. rbaggio

    rbaggio Active Member Silver Stacker

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    Thanks Fishie, didn't know it had a name.

    It annoyed me when after the Fukashima tsunami, commentators spoke of how the rebuilding effort would be a great boost to the Japanese economy.

    By logical extension, the government should flood Tokyo on purpose. Think of the massive shot in the arm in would give!
     
  8. willrocks

    willrocks Well-Known Member Silver Stacker

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    Stimulate the economy, smash something. That makes sense :/
     
  9. thatguy

    thatguy Active Member

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    How about another American Civil war... imagine all the employment as soldiers! Talk about job creation... then there is all the rebuilding... what a kick start the construction industry will get. The health care industry will be bouyed by all the wounded. I can just see the plan now, all for the good of the people :|
     
  10. Aust-Tech

    Aust-Tech New Member

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    Anyone notice the little dots on the new banknotes? look closely..they are on all the newly designed banknotes, although hidden

    http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/ac/EURion.svg

    They are added to help imaging software detect the presence of a banknote in a digital image and is called the Eurion Constellation http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/EURion_constellation

    The EURion constellation is a pattern of symbols incorporated into a number of banknote designs worldwide since about 1996. Such software can then block the user from reproducing banknotes to prevent counterfeiting using colour photocopiers. However, recent research shows that the EURion constellation may just be one of many factors used to detect currency, and is not necessarily required.

    The name "EURion constellation" was coined by Markus Kuhn, who uncovered the pattern in early 2002 while experimenting with a Xerox colour photocopier that refused to reproduce banknotes.
    The word is a portmanteau of EUR, the euro's ISO 4217 designation, and Orion, a constellation of similar shape.

    The EURion constellation first described by Kuhn consists of a pattern of five small yellow, green or orange circles, which is repeated across areas of the banknote at different orientations. The mere presence of five of these circles on a page is sufficient for some colour photocopiers to refuse processing. Andrew Steer later noted simple integer ratios between the squared distances of nearby circles, which gives further clues as to how the pattern is meant to be detected efficiently by image-processing software.

    The EURion constellation is most prominent and was therefore first recognised on the 10 euro banknote.

    Some banks integrate the constellation tightly with the remaining design of the note. On 50 DM German banknotes, the EURion circles formed the innermost circles in a background pattern of fine concentric circles. On the front of former Bank of England Elgar 20 notes, they appear as green heads of musical notes, however on the Smith 20 notes of 2007 the circles merely cluster around the '20' text. On some U.S. bills, they appear as the digit zero in small, yellow numbers matching the value of the note. On Japanese Yen, these circles sometimes appear as flowers.

    Technical details regarding the EURion constellation are kept secret by its inventors and users.

    [​IMG]

    lol..Forget Tokyo, China's gov already started with their economic strategy of rebuilding poorly built buildings that only last 25-30yrs http://www.businessweek.com/articles/2012-09-27/the-cracks-in-chinas-shiny-buildings#r=lr-sr
     
  11. Byron

    Byron Guest

    stoked that yesterday i found some old notes i had hoarded away years ago.

    4 x $1 bill

    1 x $5 coin from the New Parliament House opening.

    1 x $10 first polymer notes issued back in '88. The one with the aboriginal on them.

    Also got handed an early $5 bill in change, AA prefix - the one that is a lighter colour.

    Maybe i'm getting nostalgic but i miss the paper notes. Never thought about keeping a set, which i now regret.

    As a kid i remember taking my bithday present money to the bank, handing over the $50 bill and walking out with 25 x $2 bills. Felt rich.

    Not too mention in terms of purchasing power those notes would stretch much further than today's monopoly money. Shop at Woolies with the oldies back then and $100 would fill a trolley to the hilt...
     
  12. Holdfast

    Holdfast Well-Known Member Silver Stacker

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    Hello Byron

    After reading your post I thought I'd dig-out some of my old notes. I use to collect old pound notes and Australian Decimal notes but lost interest many years ago. :)

    Some of the two dollar notes I kept looked a bit weird because they seemed to be printed a bit scew-wiff, I've got a one dollar note that is supposed to be a trial note which has the letters DBP.

    Some of the other notes I've got:

    About 30 x $1 notes - most are new.
    Johnstone and Stone - Australia
    Knight and Wheeler - Australia
    Knight and Stone - Australia


    2 dollar notes
    Coombs and Wilson - Commonwealth Of Australia
    Phillips and Randall - Commonwealth Of Australia
    Phillips and Wheeler - Commonwealth Of Australia
    Knight and Wheeler - Australia
    Knight and Stone - Australia
    Johnstone and Stone - Australia
    Johnstone and Fraser - Australia

    5 dollar notes
    Phillips and Randall - Commonwealth Of Australia
    Phillips and Wheeler - Commonwealth Of Australia
    Knight and Wheeler - Australia
    Knight and Stone - Australia
    Johnstone and Stone - Australia
    Johnstone and Fraser - Australia
    Evans and Fraser - Australia

    10 dollar notes
    Coombs and Randall - Commonwealth Of Australia
    Phillips and Randall - Commonwealth Of Australia
    Phillips and Wheeler - Commonwealth Of Australia
    Knight and Wheeler - Australia
    Knight and Stone - Australia
    Plus a few of those polymer notes with Prefix AA

    20 dollar notes
    Coombs and Wilson - Commonwealth Of Australia XAA
    Phillips and Randall - Commonwealth Of Australia

    50 dollar notes
    Phillips and Wheeler - Commonwealth Of Australia
    Knight and Wheeler - Australia


    Ten Shilling Note
    Coombs and Wilson


    One Pound Note
    Armitage & Mc Farlane
    Coombs and Wilson


    Five Pound Note
    Coombs & Watts
    Coombs & Wilson

    Ten Pound Note
    Sheehan & Mc Farlane


    Also got some 1, 2, 5 and 10 pound notes from Bank Of England and Bank Of Scotland


    Cheers

    H
     
  13. Byron

    Byron Guest

    Nice stash Holdfast!

    Did you consciously keep the paper decimal notes when you found out they were to be replaced with the polymer ones?

    Also how did you go about getting the pre-decimal notes? Ebay, numi shop? Any tips on what to look out for (washed, ironed notes, fakes?)

    Wouldn't mind an (affordable) example some time to show the kids at school. Might make them more aware of Australia's history.
     
  14. Holdfast

    Holdfast Well-Known Member Silver Stacker

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    Hi Byron

    No nothing consciously really other than looking through my Dad's, "Renniks Australian Coin & Banknote guide" many years ago.
    Dad told me that once he had a star note and how wished he'd kept it, I think he spent it down the pub on a Scooner or two :lol:

    I'm not sure when the Commonwealth Of Australia (COA) notes were going out of circulation but I'd just go to the bank, get a swag of notes to sort through Notes (COA and Australia) to occassionally find a COA, I'd keep the COA notes regardless of their quality and then as my collection grew, I tried to get all the different signature combinations.

    Later on when they changed the thread from centre to side threads there were even more combinations that included the styles of writing on the serial numbers (Gothic or OCRB).
    Anyway, I'm no expert on notes Byron, just have a working knowledge so I won't be much help.

    I've got a few Polymer notes but I think I stopped collecting when the plastics came into circulation.

    The pound notes I collected prior to the decimals were purchased from a friend who had purchased them from a dealer but that was many years ago.

    The trial notes (DBP) were purchased from a dealer.

    So...95% of my notes are from the bank or from circulation.

    I'd probably like some one else to comment on where to buy some of the older notes cheaply because like I said, I haven't collected for years and don't know the market well. :)

    Cheers

    H
     

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