Proof coin help what's causing this

Discussion in 'Silver Coins' started by hiho, Mar 3, 2020.

  1. hiho

    hiho Active Member Silver Stacker

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2011
    Messages:
    7,954
    Likes Received:
    4
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Location:
    South Brisbane
  2. Jason1

    Jason1 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2019
    Messages:
    541
    Likes Received:
    552
    Trophy Points:
    93
    Location:
    Qld
  3. Eureka Moments

    Eureka Moments Well-Known Member Silver Stacker

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2011
    Messages:
    7,110
    Likes Received:
    486
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Location:
    bosis
    What is it a proof of? Is it part of a set and what metal/s is it supposed to be made of?
     
  4. Ian Gillman

    Ian Gillman Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2018
    Messages:
    110
    Likes Received:
    80
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Pure silver will tarnish black due to the sulphur in the atmosphere. Copper has a slightly higher affinity to sulphur than silver so throw a copper round in the box where you keep the silver to help stop the tarnishing.
     
    hiho likes this.
  5. Tin Can

    Tin Can Member

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2019
    Messages:
    60
    Likes Received:
    24
    Trophy Points:
    8
    Coin looks like a RAM 1988 $1 coin.

    My 1990s Perth Mint kookaburra proof coins have a similar problem.
     
  6. barsenault

    barsenault Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 26, 2013
    Messages:
    3,645
    Likes Received:
    289
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Location:
    United States
    What a shame. That special piece is reduced to silver spot price. I understand why so many are coming out with antique finished (Poland Mint)....because those black stains are an eye sore
     
    Coins A-Z likes this.
  7. Coins A-Z

    Coins A-Z Active Member

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2017
    Messages:
    194
    Likes Received:
    50
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Chemicals and elements in the air cause corrosion to virtually every surface. Now the rate of corrosion will vary greatly on a number of factors including metal composition, the composition of chemicals and elements that are in or comprise the air, and even temperature (as far as I understand). Pitting (at least that's what it looks like) is what you see on the rim of the coin in your picture.

    Before excessive corrosion begins, there are things you can do to mitigate the likelihood of rapid corrosion to a coin which includes common sense things like don't use PVC plastic to contain the coin, do use a more inert plastic holder, try to minimize air contact, etc, etc, etc. Corrosion cannot be undone once it occurs as far as I'm aware.
     
  8. Coins A-Z

    Coins A-Z Active Member

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2017
    Messages:
    194
    Likes Received:
    50
    Trophy Points:
    28
    True
     
  9. SilverSurfer77

    SilverSurfer77 Well-Known Member Silver Stacker

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2011
    Messages:
    2,692
    Likes Received:
    179
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Location:
    T-Bar
    It looks like a silver proof $2 coin, I would say there was possibly some sort of contaminent on the inside of the capsule. Are you the original owner?
    If not it is possible the original owner has taken it out of its capsule and the coin was contaminated. Does it look like tarnish or some sort of organic matter?
     
  10. Tin Can

    Tin Can Member

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2019
    Messages:
    60
    Likes Received:
    24
    Trophy Points:
    8
    Yes, the coin edge looks more like a $2 coin than a $1 coin.
     

Share This Page