Investing in reducing our carbon footprint

Discussion in 'Stocks & Derivatives' started by mmm....shiney!, Dec 27, 2019.

  1. mmm....shiney!

    mmm....shiney! Well-Known Member Silver Stacker

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2010
    Messages:
    19,199
    Likes Received:
    2,462
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    昆士蘭
    This is an excellent video explaining how we can reduce our carbon footprint by upping our use of low carbon emission fossil fuels such as natural gas and oil in order to meet our expected future energy needs. Rob West argues that about 50% of our future energy will have to come from fossil fuel technologies that are not currently available to the market.



    The key message from an investment point of view is that there could be a place for leading energy majors in an individual's portfolio. He mentions Shell and BP as an example.
     
    sgbuyer likes this.
  2. milled

    milled Active Member

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2018
    Messages:
    320
    Likes Received:
    152
    Trophy Points:
    43
    A pity NSW northern rivers Greenies put Metgasco to the sword. Metgasco demonstrated natgas was in superabundance in NSW and now that state relies on others.
     
    Shaddam IV and mmm....shiney! like this.
  3. mmm....shiney!

    mmm....shiney! Well-Known Member Silver Stacker

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2010
    Messages:
    19,199
    Likes Received:
    2,462
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    昆士蘭
    An ETF may be an option as well, Energy Select Sector SPDR Fund (XLE) for example has exposure to some of the US largest gas/oil companies such as Exxon and Chevron. Equinor was the other company he mentioned alongside Shell and BP, it's not traded on the ASX but has a corporate presence in the Bight.
     
  4. Oddjob

    Oddjob Well-Known Member Silver Stacker

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2018
    Messages:
    3,175
    Likes Received:
    3,359
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Oz
    Whilst not totally in line with the theme of the thread, if one wants to invest in reducing their carbon footprint they can start by getting their petrol fueled car tuned properly (injected and carbie engines).

    Cars come out of the factory with a rich fuel/air mix which is wasteful and polluting. By having the air/fuel mix tweaked by a mechanic with the right computer program and knowledge any petrol fueled car can reduce petrol usage and increase power / performance. Sure it costs about $800-$900 for a decent tune but if the tune can reduce fuel consumption by up to 25% which it did for me, then over the life of your car given rising fuel prices, you'll come out ahead and do a bit for the environment.

    I was happy was that investment.
     
    Shaddam IV, Ivykoin, JulieW and 2 others like this.
  5. mmm....shiney!

    mmm....shiney! Well-Known Member Silver Stacker

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2010
    Messages:
    19,199
    Likes Received:
    2,462
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    昆士蘭
    Future cost savings is kind of like future investment earnings so thanks @Oddjob.
     
  6. Skyrocket

    Skyrocket Well-Known Member Silver Stacker

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2014
    Messages:
    5,825
    Likes Received:
    775
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Melbourne
    Personally if I had to spend that much money for a proper tune I would prefer to spend the extra money and get an LPG gas conversion. Not only would it drastically save me money on fuel (and pay for itself in long run) but it is also a much cleaner burning fuel too which pollutes a lot less then petrol.
     
  7. sammysilver

    sammysilver Well-Known Member Silver Stacker

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2011
    Messages:
    6,248
    Likes Received:
    986
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Sydney
    It would then appear that you will do nothing.
     
  8. Oddjob

    Oddjob Well-Known Member Silver Stacker

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2018
    Messages:
    3,175
    Likes Received:
    3,359
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Oz


    Fair point re LPG cost to fill up but I think one only gets value from a LPG car that does a lot of k's ie taxi's. An LPG conversion costs anywhere between $2.5k and $4.0k odd (as opposed to a $900.00 tune), thus one has to look at k's driven p.a to ascertain payback period for initial outlay.

    LPG in cars also has it's drawbacks with the very large tank in the boot which kills you boot space or the small tyre well tank that holds bugger all. Not all mechanic's are qualified for LPG work and the calorific value of LPG is only about 80% of standard octane petrol thus one uses more LPG noting it's 40% cheaper. Plus and minuses = the persons choice.
     
    66rounds likes this.
  9. 66rounds

    66rounds Well-Known Member Silver Stacker

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2019
    Messages:
    1,506
    Likes Received:
    1,435
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Melbourne
    LPG also has a higher octane rating than petrol so if you happen to convert your turbo xr6 you get cheaper AND bigger burnouts!

    So much for investing in reducing carbon footprint :rolleyes:
     
  10. Skyrocket

    Skyrocket Well-Known Member Silver Stacker

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2014
    Messages:
    5,825
    Likes Received:
    775
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Melbourne
    I was talking what I would do. I had two 4wd's converted to gas and I didn't suffer from boot space coz I mounted the spare wheel on back bumper.
     
    Oddjob and 66rounds like this.
  11. mmm....shiney!

    mmm....shiney! Well-Known Member Silver Stacker

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2010
    Messages:
    19,199
    Likes Received:
    2,462
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    昆士蘭
    Any one know much about flow batteries and what companies may be worth following?
     
  12. mmm....shiney!

    mmm....shiney! Well-Known Member Silver Stacker

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2010
    Messages:
    19,199
    Likes Received:
    2,462
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    昆士蘭
    I was listening to a podcast about gold miners the other day, the presenter made a comment regarding a particular gold mine in NSW and said he wouldn’t put his money into that company because NSW is becoming mining unfriendly. The mining companies and local councils in NSW may possibly to come into some conflict as a result with the State government over the direction that mineral extraction is heading.
     

Share This Page