Brexit now being delayed by Cameron, possibly indefinitely

Discussion in 'Current Affairs' started by SpacePete, Jun 25, 2016.

  1. Shaddam IV

    Shaddam IV Well-Known Member Silver Stacker

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    NSW folk refer to Victoria as Mexico and Tasmania as Cuba. :)
     
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  2. JulieW

    JulieW Well-Known Member Silver Stacker

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    It takes a lot of time to make your hair look that 'oops I don't care'.
     
  3. whinfell

    whinfell Well-Known Member Silver Stacker

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    Boris the Clown in charge of the Foreign Office - what could possibly go wrong with diplomacy skills like these? :lol:

    Source: http://www.smh.com.au/world/boris-j...partment-spokesmans-lips-20160713-gq5acb.html
     
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  4. fishtaco

    fishtaco Active Member Silver Stacker

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    Nothing wrong with a single statement! I could not have said better myself!
     
  5. fishtaco

    fishtaco Active Member Silver Stacker

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    This thread just shows how many on ss still believe the MSM version of events past present and future!
     
  6. leo25

    leo25 Well-Known Member Silver Stacker

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    Boris Johnson is now the new PM. Now for Brexit to get back on track.
     
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  7. alor

    alor Well-Known Member Silver Stacker

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    its either brexit or he is fed novichock o_O

     
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  8. jultorsk

    jultorsk Well-Known Member Silver Stacker

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  9. Oddjob

    Oddjob Well-Known Member Silver Stacker

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    Corbyn rattling the "no confidence play" again for when the UK Parliament resumes next week sometime.

    https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-politics-49476705

    A no confidence motion would require some Govt members to vote with opposition, thus ensuring their expulsion from the Tory party and the prospect of all opposition members (and maybe some Tory's) in parliament going up against the Brexit Party who today announced their 650 candidates for all UK seats should an election be called.

    https://www.standard.co.uk/news/pol...threatens-fight-if-deal-returns-a4222036.html

    Given the EU Parliament elections (where Labour ran third with 14% of the vote and Brexit Party 32%), this could boomerang on Corbyn as there are more than 50% of Labour's current MP's are from electorates that voted "Leave" in 2016. Boris is also up 10 points over Labour in the polls (for what polls are worth now).

    https://fullfact.org/europe/did-maj...bour-constituencies-vote-leave-eu-referendum/

    This will be very interesting to watch play out.
     
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  10. jultorsk

    jultorsk Well-Known Member Silver Stacker

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    Indeed... here's a reasonably lucid snapshot from Wolfgang Munchau (Eurointelligence)

    August 27, 2019

    Remain’s narrowing pathway
    No, there really isn’t any Brexit news. The situation is the same as it was two weeks ago - indeed the same as it was in April when we wrote that the probability of a no-deal Brexit was high.

    This morning we think it useful to look at the strategic choices for the Remain-supporting MPs in the UK parliament, ahead of today’s meeting between Jeremy Corbyn and other opposition leaders. Anybody who ever bothered to read Art. 50 would know that there is no provision for "stopping no-deal". This is not a technical detail. If parliament does not ratify a withdrawal agreement, or revokes Brexit outright, then no-deal Brexit is the default. So, what can parliament do?

    As of this morning, there is no agreement within the Remain camp about the right course of action. This does not surprise us since every course of action has its potential traps.

    Before we went on holidays, MPs seemed to favour the option of a confidence vote. That lasted until they realised that the fixed-term parliaments act, combined with the prime minister’s prerogative to set the election date, could be potentially self-defeating. Boris Johnson could, if he wanted to, hold an election on Brexit day itself, or the day after before chaos sets in - as we also pointed out before the holiday.

    An alternative approach, which appears to have gained ground over the holidays, is to vote for another Cooper/Letwin-style piece of legislation to force the prime minister to ask for an extension. Let’s presume that this is technically possible, and parliament finds the time to do it. Even then, it is not a fail-safe mechanism. We should remember that Theresa May was a willing accomplice both times when she asked the European Council for an extension. In addition, the EU has to accept a request by unanimity. We don’t think it is possible for the parliament to water-proof this legislation. The prime minister might threaten to veto EU business if EU leaders were to agree to an extension. EU leaders might agree an extension on conditions the prime minister could reject. Both the prime minister and the EU could argue that the conditions for an extension are not given. The EU made it clear in the April decision that an extension would have to be accompanied by a way forward. It is not a unilateral decision for the UK to take. If the UK parliament merely forced the prime minister to ask for an extension, but without the prospect of an election or a second referendum, the request might be null and void. All of this tells us that MPs really didn’t read, or comprehend, Art. 50 when they voted to trigger it. It really sets a guillotine.

    And of course, it is quite possible that MPs might simply leave it too late. Angela Merkel may have misjudged the snake pit of British politics when she made her off-the-cuff remark about an alternative deal within 30 days. All she said was that in EU politics things can happen in 30 days that are impossible over longer periods. This is clearly true. The main consequences of this useful misunderstanding - useful for Johnson - is that Tory MPs may hold their fire while talks are going on. Once the process drags into the political conference season at the end of September, parliament will have run out of time to play the usual games. We agree with Zoe Williams in the Guardian this morning that Labour's choice for Labour is whether to back outright revocation.

    What about the other side? We noted one story in the Daily Mail according to which Downing Street is gaming a number of scenarios, including one of an October 17 election, to capitalise on Johnson's good polling numbers. Still, it would be a high-stakes gamble: they could lose both power and Brexit.

    Another difficult scenario would be a narrow victory for Boris Johnson in a vote of confidence, with parliament trying to force him to extend Brexit. This would be the scenario of uncertainty. He might threaten prorogation. Or a policy of the empty chair. Nothing will be what it seems.

    The events to watch out for are today’s meeting of opposition leaders, followed by Jeremy Corbyn’s decision on whether or not to go ahead with a confidence vote. We think he will. The drama will unfold then.

    A further factor to consider is legal action. No UK court can revoke Brexit, since Art. 50 is EU law. But the courts can rule on issues such as prorogation.
     
  11. jultorsk

    jultorsk Well-Known Member Silver Stacker

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    Farage positions his Brexit Party as kingmakers.

    Screen Shot 2019-08-27 at 10.34.29 pm.png
     
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  12. Roswell Crash Survivor

    Roswell Crash Survivor Well-Known Member Silver Stacker

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    So the Little Britain (LB) Party (AKA 'The Brexit Party') currently has zero seats in the House of Commons.

    The total number of UK Parliamentary electors in December 2018 was 45,775,800. (Source: Office for National Statistics)

    The LB Party collected around 5,200,000 votes in the 2019 European elections, assuming a 100% transfer, the LB Party would take in 11% of ballots.
     
  13. jultorsk

    jultorsk Well-Known Member Silver Stacker

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    The most recent polls (AUGUST 25, 2019) indicate 16% (Opinium has been closest to accurate). But you're right, 'first-pass-the-post' rule is not easy for BXP. BoJo has been decidedly positive for Conservatives.

    Screen Shot 2019-08-28 at 3.57.39 pm.png
     
  14. jultorsk

    jultorsk Well-Known Member Silver Stacker

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    Whoop. FT:
    Johnson to suspend UK parliament in bid to frustrate efforts to block no-deal Brexit
    Boris Johnson is set to suspend UK parliament for at least a month in order to curtail the efforts of MPs who hope to pass legislation to avoid a no-deal Brexit on October 31.

    British MPs will return for a week in early September, but parliament is expected to be suspended during the party conference season and ahead of a fresh Queen’s Speech, scheduled for October 14.
     
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  15. Oddjob

    Oddjob Well-Known Member Silver Stacker

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    Get it down Boris...get it done.
     
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  16. alor

    alor Well-Known Member Silver Stacker

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    self proclaims king Boris now
     
  17. Oddjob

    Oddjob Well-Known Member Silver Stacker

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    Brexit payback: What did MPs expect when they dishonoured the will of the people?

    https://www.express.co.uk/news/poli...brexit-second-referendum-peoples-vote-EU-deal

    WHAT did they expect? The great and the good, the men and women we empower with our votes to carry out a sacred duty to enact the will of the people?
    By Paul Baldwin

    PUBLISHED: 11:03, Wed, Aug 28, 2019 | UPDATED: 11:28, Wed, Aug 28, 2019

    What did they expect? Our MPs who have again and again stood in the way of a democratically mandated instruction to leave the European Union. What did they expect? The we-know-better than you 'experts', the London political elite who see all those who voted for Brexit as the enemy. They talk of democracy but since losing the vote on 23 June 2016 this rabble of disrespectful MPs have done nothing to honour the referendum result but have again and again sabotaged Brexit, and by extension sabotaged Britain. But it's now game over.

    Prime Minister Boris Johnson is by all accounts about to make those MPs redundant – only temporarily unfortunately, there may be those who think MPs who dishonour the trust placed in them by the electorate should sling their hook permanently.

    It is called proroguing and it is a desperate political measure which has triggered the expected howls of outrage from the Dominic Grieves and Tom Watsons et al in Parliament.

    But these are desperate times. Britain has to leave the EU on October 31. Not only because we voted to leave but because not doing so will undermine Britain in an unprecedented way.

    We will be seen as politically inept, incompetent, a laughing stock not to be taken seriously. The idea that Britain somehow re-negotiates remaining in the EU from this position of unprecedented weakness would be the real act of self-harm.


    [​IMG]

    Boris Johnson is about to make MPs redundant (Image: Getty)
    [​IMG]

    Tom Watson has called on MPs to help stop Boris Johnson from proroguing Parliament (Image: PA)
    We would end up paying more, receiving less and being frozen out of all meaningful debate.

    Proroguing is a Boris at his most 'do-or-die' – a very high stakes move indeed and one which should make everyone on all sides of the Brexit debate nervous. But the Prime Minster's hand has been forced.

    Parliament was given three chances to carry out the will of the people – and three times they opted for crippling inertia. No alternative solutions, no answers, just blocking the will of the people.

    It appears for our arrogant MPs, three strikes and you're out.
     
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  18. alor

    alor Well-Known Member Silver Stacker

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    the people knew how to speak
    the re-presenters only talk on their own
    people got angry
    the head roll
    the group of heads hit the brick wall
     
  19. Oddjob

    Oddjob Well-Known Member Silver Stacker

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    For the punters out there, Sportsbet are still offering $2.00 on a No Deal Brexit. Given today's events in the UK, might be easy money.

    upload_2019-8-29_0-4-40.png
     
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  20. Ipv6Ready

    Ipv6Ready Well-Known Member Silver Stacker

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    What’s the odds on “New Kingdom” of Scotland, NI and Ireland?
     

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