2014 Budget

Discussion in 'Current Affairs' started by aleks, May 12, 2014.

  1. Big A.D.

    Big A.D. Well-Known Member Silver Stacker

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    So where does corporate tax figure into all of this?

    Can we squeeze a bottle shop into the analogy? Do libertarians stick to homebrew kits?
     
  2. JulieW

    JulieW Well-Known Member Silver Stacker

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    Source: Tandberg
     
  3. mmm....shiney!

    mmm....shiney! Well-Known Member Silver Stacker

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    @bordie, that table you posted gets kept by me, next time I'm having an argument with someone about the welfare State, or failures of Democracy, or mining coal etc etc (and it's usually with my friends who are mostly ignorant-Gina-Rinehart-Hating-chardonnay-socialists) I can shut them up with a quick smack in the face with the reality (newtosilver would be proud).
     
  4. bordsilver

    bordsilver Well-Known Member Silver Stacker

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    We can squeeze them in by having an 11th person who is also forced to pay $10 even though they do home brew and don't turn up to drink beer at the pub with the others.

    Or perhaps they could be the missus who hates beer and wanted wine instead but was forced to pay $10 for beer she didn't drink. (Then she gets taken home by drunken louts and gets royally f****d and is told "It's not rape - it's a snuggle with a struggle" ;) )
     
  5. Nugget

    Nugget New Member Silver Stacker

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    LOL - I said I was wasting my time :p
     
  6. fiatphoney

    fiatphoney New Member

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    [​IMG]



    Didn't expect this as a googlead.
     
  7. mmm....shiney!

    mmm....shiney! Well-Known Member Silver Stacker

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    Those least concerned about Australia's economic outlook would be those on welfare.
     
  8. JulieW

    JulieW Well-Known Member Silver Stacker

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    Agree there.
     
  9. aleks

    aleks Well-Known Member Silver Stacker

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    So that school chaplaincy program being implemented is happening at the cost of social workers/youth workers and psychologist at schools if I understand correctly

    $245 million dollars for people who aren't trained to work children
     
  10. AngloSaxon

    AngloSaxon Active Member

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    It was my secular high school counsellor in the pre-Howard years who suggested to me that i go to University and that was the only path for someone with my family background.

    A couple of decades later I'm staring at a HECS debt on numerous degrees that may take another 12-15 years to settle and it took me 10 years to throw off the stupid ideas that university ingrained in me. Social workers in school now are all damaged goods themselves who are only a benefit to the few with anorexia or mental issues. They don't do anything for the general mass of kids.

    I wish there was a chaplain back then when I was at school who would have sat me down and put forward a different point of view and suggested I think differently. I really do.
     
  11. southerncross

    southerncross Well-Known Member Silver Stacker

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    All in your mind
    The states are free to pay for whatever they would like in state school's.
     
  12. aleks

    aleks Well-Known Member Silver Stacker

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    Sounds like a developmental psychologist could have discussed some of the issues you faced in the stage moving from adolesence and looking forward into adulthood.

    I take it you weren't abused or experienced neglect from your parents as child? Yes I know that is not what social workers do in schools.
     
  13. gooby

    gooby New Member Silver Stacker

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    Secular counselors are obviously a terrible idea. They might encourage you to go to university, which is clearly a bad move in the anti-intellectual bogan culture of Australia. A religious nut would be much better; they'd encourage you to talk to a magical being to ask for guidance when you needed it. How could you go wrong with that?

    Although, without secular counselors, who would we blame for our poor educational and career choices? Such a quandary...
     
  14. Ghost Story

    Ghost Story Active Member

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    interesting stuff :)

    I am sure priests have their usefulness :D but in non religious schools I can only seeing it causing drama, if people want religious training or counseling there are already plenty of those schools around, so for me a waste of funds.
     
  15. AngloSaxon

    AngloSaxon Active Member

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    I'm not blaming them. They were just one voice amongst many saying 'go to uni' like the rest of society. After going to university numerous times I believe too many people go to uni and too many occupations require it too.

    Only one person in my family said 'go into business' or 'is there a shop you'd like to run'. No one I knew said 'get a trade'. That's far too passe.

    Why do you assume a chaplain will only want to talk about religion? You realise religious people go on to do the same jobs as atheists. If you look past your obvious biases what I said was I wished for a different perspective and it's good for kids to today to hear from more perspectives than the usual arts-degree counsellor saying 'Go to uni' and 24 year old teachers saying 'go to uni' because that's what they did.

    From when people leave high school we're an overeducated and underqualified society.
     
  16. gooby

    gooby New Member Silver Stacker

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    I agree with most of that. Too many people who absolutely don't belong in a university environment are going to university. Universities have gone from being relatively elite academic institutions where applications from only the brightest students are considered to being seen as somewhere that everybody with an IQ above 7 should be entitled to go. People now go just because they feel like they 'should have a degree'. This has resulted in the dumbing down of courses in order for the twits who shouldn't even be there to be able to pass, as well as giving those people even more of an entitlement mentality in that they think their time is worth some inordinate amount of remuneration because they have a 'degree' in gender studies (which they do not need for their career in dole-collecting). The dumbing down is a vicious cycle whereby things move toward the lowest common denominator (i.e. catering to morons), but the lowest common denominator is constantly becoming lower as a result.

    University is not for most people and was never intended to be, but, somehow, it has become seen as something for the masses, and society is suffering as a result. Many people would be far better off going into a trade or even unskilled labor. Universities are supposed to be inherently elitist - if not, we might as well just call them all TAFE colleges.

    As for arts degrees - they have their place (I'm not doing one, for the record!). I think the main problem is that most of the people who go into them are the "I should have a degree because I am special" type, not the "I need to learn this so I can achieve these goals" type. They spend a few years at uni handing out their Socialist Alternative rubbish and thrusting petitions in people's faces as they try to pass, then graduate with a degree in nothing-in-particular which qualifies them (barely) to complete their claim forms for welfare payments.

    Essentially, I think that the way to fix these problems is to return to having strict academic standards for university entry. So many of the students currently at university would have likely been laughed off of the campus had they shown up to the admissions office seeking admission a few decades ago (or, at the very least, politely informed that university is not for them).
     
  17. wrcmad

    wrcmad Well-Known Member Silver Stacker

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    Agree.
    But I think this mentality is nurtured at the school level.
    Students are forced to stay in school until 17 yrs.
    The Education Dept has pandered to the parents, who cotton-wool-wrap-my-poor-Johhny to the extent where kids are unable to "fail" academically anymore - they just don't grade as well as the other students. :rolleyes:
    This really prepares them well for real life outside of the academic system {sarcastic smiley}.
     
  18. gooby

    gooby New Member Silver Stacker

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    Yes, definitely. Obviously, some kids do 'bloom' a bit later than others, but there are also a lot of kids who just don't bloom at all. Telling these kids that they're doing ok when they are clearly not doing ok is not going to help anybody.

    You can see this sort of thing in the language used on report cards now. Instead of a 'fail' (or similar) grade option, it's something more like 'still developing'. When little Johnny is 14 and still almost illiterate, little Johnny is not still developing; he's just stupid. That may or may not be his fault, but stupid is stupid and sugar-coating it won't change that. It will, however, give Johnny unrealistic expectations about what to expect in and from life and cause him to not consider career options that are appropriate for him.
     
  19. JulieW

    JulieW Well-Known Member Silver Stacker

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    Good points from my second favourite rightwing blogger:

     
  20. JulieW

    JulieW Well-Known Member Silver Stacker

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